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Good Governance

Welcome to our new 'Good Governance' section - providing useful information and support in one place, to help you get things right.

The vast majority of charity trustees are trying their best to do a good job. Where people raise concerns with us about charities, it's usually caused by a lack of awareness and support or a failure in decision making, rather than intentional misconduct.


What do we mean by ‘Good Governance’?

These are the elements that, handled properly, make for good governance in a charity. You can click on each one to read case studies:

 


We hope you find this useful - and if you have any ideas or comments, please feel free to contact us at info@oscr.org.uk


OSCR key guidance

You can find other guidance using our Documentation and Guidance search.


Links to others’ guidance

While we can’t accept responsibility for the accuracy of third parties’ guidance, these items may be of interest and are generally applicable to Scottish charities.

Do you have a suggestion for other useful guidance?  Email us here.

Good Governance Award
This award has been developed to celebrate and promote the role of good organisational governance in the third sector. It is is delivered by Dundee Voluntary Action.

The Good Governance Award is recommended by OSCR as an excellent tool for charities to help them focus on their ongoing development and support their improvement in key areas relating to governance and management.

 

Useful Tools


Find Support

Scotland has a network of support organisations focused on helping charities - Third Sector Interface groups. There's one for each local authority area and you can find yours at the Voluntary Action Scotland website.

You can also find support from a parent or professional body, or find an accountant or charity lawyer through the links below.


Inquiry Reports

Where we issue a Direction to a charity, we are required under section 33 of the 2005 Act to publish a report.  You may see us refer to these as ‘section 33 reports’ or ‘inquiry reports’.  We may also choose to publish an inquiry report where we decide it is in the public interest, or if the case highlights key lessons for the wider sector.  Our primary aim is to highlight 'key lessons' so that the wider sector can see what went wrong and how it was addressed.

We publish our inquiry reports typically for a 12 month period.  For earlier reports, please contact us here to request a copy.